Augusta Genealogical Society hosts virtual symposium

The Augusta Genealogical Society will host its Annual Symposium on August 8 in virtual format.

Diane L. Richard, a noted professional genealogist and editor of the North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal, will be the speaker. The meeting will be from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. with four lectures. The first, “The Story of Rachel,” is a talk about a female slave who freed around 1800. The other scheduled lectures are: “Born in North Carolina and Living Elsewhere: Making a Connection Back,” “Women in Ledgers/Geography, Politics, Religion and More,” and “On the Road Again: Are Your Ancestors Hiding in Road Records?”

The cost of the symposium is $30 for members, $35 for nonmembers. To register, go to augustagensociety.org. The deadline is August 7, but sign up soon so you won’t forget. This is a great opportunity to hear from a nationally known genealogist without leaving home. She is truly an expert in North Carolina research, and many have roots leading through that state. The handouts that will be part of the lectures will be great for future reference and use.

Carolina Room in Charlotte

The Carolina Room of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Library System is a great place to visit, but has not yet reopened for patrons. But it’s offering services by phone and by email Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. at 704-416-0150 or carolinaroom@cmlibrary.org. There are great resources on the website, including a lot of historical information about the area. Go to cmlibrary.org, then to the listing of branches, where you can select the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room.

1880 census, check all the schedules

The 1880 census is a great resource, but don’t forget to check the Defective, Dependent, and Delinquent Classes Schedule on Ancestry.com. This includes people who were blind, paupers, mentally ill, homeless and prisoners.

Contact Kenneth H. Thomas Jr., P. O. Box 901, Decatur, Ga., 30031 or kenthomasongenealogy.com.

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